Obama’s Financial Reforms: Half a Loaf?

Paul Krugman: “A lot of the debate over the Sanders insurgency hinges on whether you see Obama-era reforms as trivial, utterly inadequate to the problems, or as a half loaf that’s a lot better than none.”

Krugman argues that when it comes to financial reform, “it partly depends on what you consider the problem … too-big-to-fail is not the key issue, so that the fact that big banks remain big is, um, no big deal. The real question — or so I’d argue — is leverage within the financial sector, and in particular the kind of leverage with no safety net that characterizes shadow banking.”

“So Matt O’Brien weighs in with evidence that leverage has in fact declined substantially, and continued to decline even as the economy expanded — probably because of Dodd-Frank. This is certainly right; the same decline shows up in other measures, as in the chart above showing financial sector debt securities as a percentage of GDP.”

“Dodd-Frank’s rules — especially, I think, the prospect of being classed as a SIFI, a strategically important institution subject to tighter constraints, have had a real effect in reducing risk … The reality of the Obama era, for progressives, is a series of half loaves. But after all the defeats over the previous 30 years, aren’t those achievements something to celebrate?”

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