Is Charles Koch Feeling the Bern?

Charles Koch contends that he and Bernie Sanders agree on the fact that “the political and economic system is often rigged to help the privileged few at the expense of everyone else, particularly the least advantaged.”

“Democrats and Republicans have too often favored policies and regulations that pick winners and losers. This helps perpetuate a cycle of control, dependency, cronyism and poverty in the United States. These are complicated issues, but it’s not enough to say that government alone is to blame. Large portions of the business community have actively pushed for these policies.”

“That’s why Koch Industries opposes all forms of corporate welfare — even those that benefit us.”

“The United States’ next president must be willing to rethink decades of misguided policies enacted by both parties that are creating a permanent underclass.”

“I applaud the senator for giving a voice to many Americans struggling to get ahead in a system too often stacked in favor of the haves, but I disagree with his desire to expand the federal government’s control over people’s lives. This is what built so many barriers to opportunity in the first place.”

“It is results, not intentions, that matter. History has proven that a bigger, more controlling, more complex and costlier federal government leaves the disadvantaged less likely to improve their lives.”

13 Comments

  1. I get it! Businesses and the “privileged few” are responsible for the gross disparity in wealth in our country, so who better than to set the system to rights than businesses and the “privileged few”?

    1. Well, hate to tell ya, but no matter who gets elected President, it’s going to be one of the privileged few. By definition.

      1. I guess it depends how you define “privileged.” Without dipping too far back into our country’s history of those who became President without being born into wealth, here’s some Wikipedia dope on Jimmy Carter I found interesting:

        Carter was born on October 1, 1924, at the Wise Sanatorium in Plains, Georgia. Plains was a boomtown of 600 people when Carter was born. Carter’s father, James Earl Carter, Sr., was a successful local businessman who ran a general store and had begun to invest in farmland. He had been a reserve second lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s Quartermaster Corps during World War I. Carter’s mother, Bessie Lillian Gordy, was a nurse at the Wise hospital.

        The Carters settled on a dirt road in nearby Archery, which was almost entirely populated by impoverished African American families. Although Earl was staunchly pro-segregation, he allowed his son to befriend the black farmhands’ children. An enterprising teenager, Carter was given his own acre of Earl’s farmland where he grew, packaged, and sold peanuts.

        Privileged? Certainly he had advantages many young people do not. But his success had far more to do with his determination, strength of character, and humanity than it did with being born into wealth.

    2. Well, hate to tell ya, but no matter who gets elected President, it’s going to be one of the privileged few. By definition.

  2. He’s scared of Hillary Clinton.

    And not even a little tiny bit of Bernie Sanders.

    The only other possible explanation would be that everything we’ve ever thought about him is wrong.

    I’m going with the first option.

    1. There’s a third possibility: He’s seeing the real possibility that Bernie might become President, and he’s decided that now he needs to start to diminish the contempt that Bernie has for him. As regards Hillary Clinton, he wouldn’t mind if she were to become President; and here is why:

    2. There’s a third possibility: He’s seeing the real possibility that Bernie might become President, and he’s decided that now he needs to start to diminish the contempt that Bernie has for him. As regards Hillary Clinton, he wouldn’t mind if she were to become President; and here is why:

    3. If he attacks Sanders directly, then that will only help him, which I don’t think he wants to do (unless he’s convinced he won’t win, which might be the case). By sort of agreeing, and then bringing out the “big intrusive government is scary” argument, he wins points for anti-establishment populism from people who care about such things. Which is kind of weird, since he isn’t running for office, but maybe even the Koch brothers care about being well thought of.

      I think if he has a deliberate strategy here, he’s hoping that people associate “misguided policies” and “corporate welfare” with Clinton and Obama. If he can hurt Clinton without helping Sanders too much, that’s probably a win from his point of view.

      We probably shouldn’t read too much into this, though.

    4. If he attacks Sanders directly, then that will only help him, which I don’t think he wants to do (unless he’s convinced he won’t win, which might be the case). By sort of agreeing, and then bringing out the “big intrusive government is scary” argument, he wins points for anti-establishment populism from people who care about such things. Which is kind of weird, since he isn’t running for office, but maybe even the Koch brothers care about being well thought of.

      I think if he has a deliberate strategy here, he’s hoping that people associate “misguided policies” and “corporate welfare” with Clinton and Obama. If he can hurt Clinton without helping Sanders too much, that’s probably a win from his point of view.

      We probably shouldn’t read too much into this, though.

  3. He’s trying to improve his image. I’ve heard the Koch brothers are very concerned about their image and how it is portrayed by the media.

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