Immigration

How Offering Driver’s Licenses to Immigrants Here Illegally Makes Roads Safer

NPR Code Switch: “Researchers at Stanford University this week published a study that may bolster the argument that policies aimed at encouraging immigrants to come out of the shadows actually improve public safety. They found that a 2013 California law granting driver’s licenses to immigrants in the country illegally reduced hit-and-run accidents by 7 to 10 percent in 2015, meaning roughly 4,000 fewer hit-and-runs. In that same year, 600,000 people got driver’s licenses under the law.”

“The researchers suggest that ‘consequently, unauthorized immigrants with a valid form of in-state driving authorization have weaker incentives to flee the scene after an accident, because they are less likely to fear deportation.’ Their study also found that the license law did not increase the number of traffic accidents overall, as opponents had claimed it would. It did not decrease the number either. But the decline in hit-and-run accidents was a positive sign, the researchers wrote.”

Why American Universities Need Immigrants

Jonathan R. Cole: “…the willingness to assimilate foreigners into American society has been part of the nation’s strength—a productive force that has added vitality to a maturing culture. The same has been true of U.S. universities’ attitudes toward foreign faculty and students with talent. Now, with President Trump’s actions that stigmatize those who are foreign-born and limit immigration, in addition to his promise to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, universities and the nation are under threat. The history of the past 75 years suggests how important the contributions of immigrant scholars and students have been to the vitality of America’s universities.”

“…recent statistics on America’s success at conducting Nobel-quality research suggest that the contribution of immigrants to domestic universities is still very much alive. In 2016, six Americans won prizes in physics, chemistry, and economics. Each of these winners was an immigrant.”

Here’s How the Travel Ban Could Affect Your Health

“Here is an interesting detail about Trump’s new executive order on immigration: Thousands of America’s doctors hail from the six affected countries,” AJ Willingham writes for CNN.

“According to the Immigrant Doctors Project, headed by researchers from Harvard and MIT, more than 7,000 physicians in the US were trained in a country blacklisted under the new immigration order.”

“Cities and states in the Midwest have a high concentration of doctors whose backgrounds mean they would be affected by the new travel ban. Again, it’s not just about the doctors themselves — it’s also about the patients they treat. Other than California and New York, which top the list by population density and diversity alone, the states that rely most on physicians trained in travel ban countries are Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Florida.”

Most Americans Continue to Oppose U.S. Border Wall

Pew Research: “As was the case throughout the presidential campaign, more Americans continue to oppose (62%) than favor (35%) building a wall along the entire U.S. border with Mexico. And while President Donald Trump has said the U.S. would make Mexico pay for the wall, the public is broadly skeptical: 70% think the U.S. would ultimately pay for the wall, compared with just 16% who think Mexico would pay for it.”

How Immigrants Are Helping Detroit’s Recovery

The Economist: “‘We are proud of our Muslim community in Michigan,’ says Rick Snyder, the state’s Republican governor, sitting in his office in the grandiose Cadillac Place, the former headquarters of General Motors. Ever since his first state-of-the-state address in 2011, Mr Snyder has emphasised the importance of welcoming people from across the world to this large midwestern state.”

“Mr. Snyder and Mike Duggan, the mayor of Detroit, are making population growth a gauge of their efforts to revitalise a state that is slowly recovering from a ‘lost decade’ and a city devastated by the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history. Between 2000 and 2010 Michigan lost nearly 800,000 jobs, income per head fell from America’s 17th-highest to 39th, and residents fled. In the same period the population of Detroit, a city built for 2m, plunged to just over 700,000. By the start of the next decade the city’s roads had fallen into disrepair; public schools were among the worst in the country; thousands of households had no running water and tens of thousands of building plots were derelict or vacant.”

“In his most recent state-of-the state address last month, the governor set the goal of reaching 10m state residents again in the next three years. He proudly pointed out that, in the past six years, Michigan had gained 50,000 new people. ‘Immigrants account for all of that population growth,’ explains Steve Tobocman, head of Global Detroit, a non-profit organisation promoting immigration.”

Donald Trump’s Wall May Stop Immigrants Who Want to Return to Mexico

Ana Raquel Minian: “Donald Trump’s executive order to build a wall between Mexico and the United States overlooks how the fences, walls, and border-control measures that already exist between the two countries have come to act as a barrier—or a ‘cage of gold’—that discourages migrants from leaving the United States, rather than preventing their entrance in the first place.”

“Trump has never acknowledged that since the Great Recession the net outflow of Mexicans is larger than the inflow, and instead, continues to insist that the wall is necessary to curtail Mexican undocumented migration… But it’s a wall that will likely reinforce the bars of the cage of gold and discourage those who are already here to continue leaving as they have done since the Great Recession.”

How Immigrants Have Made America a Leader in Technology Innovation

“The vital role of immigrants in American technology innovation is so well documented that it shouldn’t need repeating. But in light of last week’s executive order that blocks access to the United States by citizens of seven countries with a collective population of well over 200 million, a few reminders might be timely,” John Villasenor writes in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

“America’s well-deserved reputation as a global leader in technology innovation is inseparable from its tradition of welcoming people from other countries. The list of American companies co-founded by immigrants includes Google, Yahoo, eBay, Qualcomm, VMware, Facebook, and many more. A 2016 study by the National Foundation for American Policy found that over half of the 87 tech start-ups valued at over $1 billion at the time of the study were co-founded by immigrants and that each of these companies had created an average of 760 jobs.”

“When children of immigrants are included, the impact on job creation and economic prosperity is even larger: A 2012 report from a group of business leaders and mayors from across the political spectrum noted that ‘more than 40 percent of America’s Fortune 500 companies were founded by an immigrant or a child of an immigrant.‘”

 

Trump’s Immigration Order Lays Out a Way to Turn the Temporary Ban into a Permanent One

Vox: “The current blacklist is temporary — it’s supposed to last 90 days. But the executive order lays out a process — which, coincidentally, is also supposed to take about 90 days — for replacing the temporary blacklist with a permanent one.”

  • In the next 30 days: The State Department and Department of Homeland Security conduct a review of all procedures for letting people into the US, and determine what information they will need to collect from everyone entering the US to prove an applicant ‘is who the individual claims to be and is not a security or public safety threat.’ The departments then submit a report to the White House listing all the information it will need from applicants, as well as the countries that don’t yet provide that information.
  • When the report is submitted: The secretary of state puts all countries that don’t yet provide all needed information about applicants on notice: They have 60 days to start complying, or they’ll get added to the ban list. (Some reports have indicated that new countries will be added within 60 days of the order; this step in the process appears to be what they’re talking about.)
  • 60 days after the report is submitted: Any countries that haven’t yet given the US all the information it wants will be added to the ban list.”

Trump’s Ban Isn’t Just Inhumane—It’ll Make America Dumber 

Emily Dreyfuss: “Universities and colleges across the US have come out in condemnation of Trump’s ban because of this threatened brain drain, from Harvard to the University of California. Former Republican governor of Indiana Mitch Daniels, now the president of Purdue University wrote: ‘The President’s order related to immigration is a bad idea, poorly implemented, and I hope that he will promptly revoke and rethink it.'”

“Reza Kahlor, a green card-holder, is an Iranian scientist at Harvard who before this week was deciding between applying for professorships at top US universities or starting a company in Boston based on his biological discoveries. But if this ban restricts his ability to travel, he says he’d maybe rethink and go to Germany, or France, or Canada. That would be one less entrepreneur the US gets to claim as its own, one less potential discovery that could turn into an industry-changing technology that could generate jobs.”

Quartz: Graduate Schools Will Be Hardest Hit by Trump’s Immigration Ban

The US Has More Immigrant Inventors Than Every Other Country Combined

Quartz: “Recent research on the immigration patterns of high-skilled workers (pdf), shows that, from 2000 to 2010, the US received over 190,000 inventors migrate to the US, while only a little over 10,000 left the country. The US received more inventors combined than every other country, and was one of only two countries in the study with a positive net migration.”

“US president Donald Trump has promised substantial changes to US immigration policy, some of which may threaten the country’s preeminence in attracting innovative immigrants.”